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Changing Food and Nutrition for Your 8-12 Month

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Take this quiz and test your nutrition knowledge!

Friday, May 26th, 2017

Your baby may be on the move, crawling, or getting ready to take some first steps. His diet is on the move too, changing in so many ways. Take the following interactive quiz to test your nutrition knowledge on feeding your 8-12 month old.

TRUTH OR MYTH QUIZ 8-12 MONTHS

Question 1 of 8: Truth or Myth?  Protein-rich foods, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, or other good sources of protein should be eaten daily by your child. 

True!

Infants should be offered a variety of foods every day to ensure that their nutrient needs are met, and that includes good sources of protein such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, or other high quality protein – offered daily or as often as possible. Protein is essential for healthy growth and development.  Just be sure everything has an appropriate texture and consistency for your baby's developmental stage. You can gradually increase food consistency and variety as he gets older.

Sorry, true!

Infants should be offered a variety of foods every day to ensure that their nutrient needs are met, and that includes good sources of protein such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, or other high quality protein - offered daily or as often as possible. Protein is essential for healthy growth and development. Just be sure everything has an appropriate texture and consistency for your baby's developmental stage. You can gradually increase food consistency and variety as she gets older.

Question 2 of 8: Truth or Myth? Bananas are a potassium-rich food for your child.

Correct!

Some infant diets do not contain enough fruits, vegetables, and adequate potassium.  Bananas are rich in potassium. So are tomatoes, potatoes, avocado, cantaloupe and some types of courgettes and other squash. Try incorporating these foods into your 8-12 month olds' diet but make sure they are prepared safely and are developmentally appropriate for your child.

It's true!

Some infant diets do not contain enough fruits, vegetables, and adequate potassium. Bananas are rich in potassium. So are tomatoes, potatoes, avocado, cantaloupe and some types of courgettes and other squash.  Try incorporating these foods into your 8-12 month olds' diet but make sure they are prepared safely and are developmentally appropriate for your child.

Question 3 of 8: Truth or Myth?  Taste is more important than texture.

Right!

Both are equally important! At 8-12 months of age, your baby is exploring everything, including new tastes and textures. His ability to pick up small items, along with the ability to use his jaw for mashing, makes it the perfect time for him to start eating finger foods that dissolve easily, as well as foods that have more texture yet are still very soft.  Remember that, in order to to increase your baby’s acceptance of new foods, up to 8 offerings of the new taste may be needed before your baby readily eats and accepts the food.

Oops, not right!

Both are equally important! At 8-12 months of age, your baby is exploring everything, including new tastes and textures. His ability to pick up small items, along with the ability to use his jaw for mashing, makes it the perfect time for him to start eating finger foods that dissolve easily, as well as foods that have more texture yet are still very soft.  Remember that, in order to to increase your baby’s acceptance of new foods, up to 8 offerings of the new taste may be needed before your baby readily eats and accepts the food.

Question 4 of 8: Truth or Myth?  Apple slices are easy to pick up and hold - they make good finger foods for 8-12 month olds.

Sorry, that's a myth!

Raw apples are hard and don't dissolve easily, so they're not appropriate for your 8-12 month olds' eating skills. Also, children at this age don't have the teeth to chew the apple peel. Finger foods for your baby should be diced into small pieces, have a soft texture and dissolve quickly in her mouth.

Well done!

Raw apples are hard and don't dissolve easily, so they're not appropriate for your 8-12 month olds' eating skills. Also, children at this age don't have the teeth to chew the apple peel. Finger foods for your baby should be diced into small pieces, have a soft texture and dissolve quickly in her mouth.

Question 5 0f 8: Truth or Myth?  You should let your baby play with her food when she's learning to eat. 

Well done!

Letting your child play with her food allows her to explore it and her other senses.  Finger foods also help develop fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination.

Nope, sorry.

Letting your child play with her food allows her to explore it and her other senses.  Finger foods also help develop fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination.

Question 6 of 8: Truth or Myth? Most 8-12 month old babies naturally decrease the amount of breast milk they drink now that they are eating solids.

Oops, not right!

As your baby's solid food intake increases, his breast milk intake will naturally decrease. a little, by about 60 ml a day

You're right.

As your baby's solid food intake increases, his breast milk intake will naturally decrease. a little, by about 60 ml a day.

Question 7 of 8: Truth or Myth?  You can add cow’s milk to your baby’s diet when she’s 8 month old.

Not right.

Experts state that cow’s milk should not replace breast milk in your baby’s diet before the age of 1 year. As part of your baby’s solid food diet, tailored-to-baby sized and textured cheese can be offered when your baby is developmentally ready.

Right on!

Experts state that cow’s milk should not replace breast milk in your baby’s diet before the age of 1 year.  As part of your baby’s solid food diet, tailored-to-baby sized and textured cheese can be offered when your baby is developmentally ready.

Question 8 of 8: Truth or Myth? There's no real benefit to feeding your 8-12 month old at family mealtime, better to serve him his food first.

Not quite.

Your baby should eat with the rest of the family. Babies learn by watching others - family meals are a great opportunity for you all to model healthy eating behaviours!

Good one!

It's true, your baby should eat with the rest of the family. Babies learn by watching others - family meals are a great opportunity for you all to model healthy eating behaviours!

Your 8-12 month old's nutritional needs are changing as fast as he is. Some highlights to remember and put into action include:

  • Offer your baby poultry, fish, eggs or other good sources of protein daily, or as often as possible. Vitamin A-rich fruits and vegetables should also be part of his daily diet.
  • Be sure everything has an appropriate texture and consistency for your baby's developmental stage.
  • Bananas are rich in potassium, as are tomatoes and potatoes. Incorporate these foods into your 8-12 month olds' diet - make sure they're cooked, chopped or mashed so she can eat them safely.
  • Taste and texture are equally important! Be sure to offer finger foods that dissolve easily as well as foods that have more texture yet are still very soft.
  • Raw apples are hard and don't dissolve easily, so they're not appropriate for your 8-12 month olds' eating skills.
  • Let your baby play with her food while she's learning to eat. Allow her to explore it with all her senses!
  • As your baby's solid food intake increases, his breast milk intake will naturally decrease a little, by about 60 ml a day.
  • It is important for your baby and the rest of the family to eat together. Babies learn by watching others so it's a great opportunity for you all to model healthy eating behaviours!

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